Baby Blanket pattern using I-corg

Magicord Machine Baby Bow Trimmed Afghan©

DESIGNED BY CARA L. BERNHAUSER PRESENTS “TOMORROW’S HEIRLOOMS”

Copyrighted by Cara Bernhauser

Obtained from Cara’s Free Page: www.cara4webshopping.com

 

FINISHED DIMENSIONS:

  • Small: Approx. 24″ x 36″ (61cm x 92cm)
  • Medium: Approx. 30″ x 42″ (76cm x 107cm)
  • Large: Approx. 36″ x 48″ (92cm X 122cm)

TENSION: 16.67 sts and 25.56 rows = 4″/10cm measured over the pattern using the Classic/ISM Keyplate dot 3.

MATERIALS:

Any D.K. 100gram yarn.
Size S M L Yarn Color
Balls 3 4 5 #01 White
Baby yarn, or sport weight yarn:
Size S M L Yarn Color
Oz. 3 4 5 Each Aqua & Peach.

Bond America’s Magicord Machine.

A two-prong tool to hang LL cords.

TECHNIQUES:

  • This design is made by hanging the cords on the heads of the knitting loom/machine needles every 10 rows. (to hand knit, on purl rows, pick up a loop from cord and knit both loop and stitch as one.)
  • The color order is 2 cords of the Aqua, then 2 cords of the Peach.
  • The body of the afghan is knit, afterwards the loops are whip stitched at intervals to form the bows.

TO MAKE MAGICORD LENGTHS:

Small:

  1. With the baby yarn make:
  2. 12 cords, each color, 30″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Weave the ends into the cord.
  3. This forms the long lengths [LL]
  4. 30 cords, each color, 6″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Knot ends to form a loop.
  5. Weave the knotted ends into the cord.
  6. (It is easier to knit 16 yards with the magicord machine, then cut these to the finished lengths.
  7. (I’ve allowed extra for cutting.)

Medium:

  • With the baby yarn make:
  • 14 cords, each color, 36″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Weave the ends into the cord.
  • This forms the long lengths [LL]
  • 35 cords, each color, 6″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Knot the ends to form a loop.
  • Weave the knotted ends into the cord.
  • (It is easier to make 22 yards with the magicord machine, then cut these to the finished lengths.
  • (I’ve allowed extra for cutting.)

Large:

  • With the baby yarn make:
  • 16 cords, each color, 42″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Weave the ends into the cord.
  • This forms the long lengths [LL].
  • 56 cords, each color, 6″ long, leaving a 3″ tail at each end. Knot the ends to form a loop.
  • Weave the knotted ends into the cord.
  • (It is easier to knit 30 yards with the Magicord machine, then cut these to the finished lengths.
  • (I’ve allowed extra for cutting.)

TO KNIT THE BODY OF THE AFGHAN:

  1. Bring forward to HP:
    1. 100 needles for the small size baby afghan. (cast on 100 sts.)
    2. 126 needles for the medium size baby afghan. (cast on 126 sts.)
    3. 150 needles for the large size baby afghan. (cast on 150 sts.)
  2. COR (The carriage is on the right side.)
  3. Hang the hem.
  4. Hang the Aqua LL cord across the heads of the needles (hand knitters, leave 3 inches of cord loose. Knit one loop of cord with EACH stitch across row. leave excess hang off edge.):
    1. Fold the LL cord in half to find the center.
    2. Insert the two-prong tool into the center of the LL, then hang onto the center two needles. (To reduce bulk, use only one strand of the yarn in the cord (half a stitch).
    3. Work from the center outward to each side, hanging the cord evenly. Hanging two stitches, skipping one, works the best. 3″ or more will be left at each edge. (This will be sewn to the sides later.)
  5. Knit ten rows. Knit the first row slowly. It helps to keep the cord beneath the fabric guide as you knit.
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for your total length:
    1. 230 rows for the small size.
    2. 270 rows for the medium size.
    3. 310 rows for the large size.
  7. Hang your last LL cord.
  8. Bind off by back stitch method (or your favorite method).
  9. Remove from the machine.

FINISH THE VERTICAL SIDES:

  1. Look at the vertical sides.
  2. The bottom cord’s ends will go up the sides to where the next cord begins. If it is longer than needed, unravel to the proper length.
  3. Sew the cord to the sides.
  4. Graft the ends to the new cord at the bend.
  5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until you reach the last cord.
  6. Graft the last cord in the corner.

m-fig1.gif

makebow.gif

 

  1. Look at picture m-fig1.gif. There are 2 cords of each color. The bows are made between the cords of the same color.
  2. Fold the 6″ loops in half, figure-eight style, with the knot in the center of the bow. (See makebow.gif)
  3. Whip stitch the center loops, between the same color cords, for your size:
    1. For the small size, 3 bows, one in the center, the other two centered on each side.
    2. For the medium size, 3 bows, one in the center, the other two centered on each side.
    3. For the large size, 4 bows, evenly spaced, approximately 8″ apart.
    4. Weave in any loose threads as you go.
  4. Whip stitch the end loops, to make bows along the edge. Place them only where the centered bows are. (Only between the same colored cords.)

FINISHING:

  1. Lightly steam the baby afghan on WRONG SIDE. Do not use iron. Acrylic goes limp with too much heat, so do not let iron touch fabric. Pull lightly into shape as you steam to block square, if needed.

Leg Warmers to knit, crochet, or machine knit.

Cara’s Leg Warmers Knitting Pattern for Everyone!

copyrighted by Cara L Bernhauser, my site is https://www.cara4webshopping.com

Leg warmers are actually like sleeves with ribbing on both ends.

NOTE: We don’t make leg warmers for sale, this is a pattern to knit your own.

. Read directions down this column. Your answers:
. Make a swatch of the pattern for leggings. (Could be fair isle, ribs, plain knitting, etc.)
A Put your stitch gauge here (stitches per inch). .
B Put your row gauge here (rows per inch). .
C Measure the ankle width (make sure heel will fit through). .
D Measure the calf (or the thigh) at the widest point. .
E Measure Length from ankle to top, for total length. .
F Now decide how much ribbing will be at each end. .
G Multiply the stitch gauge [A] times ankle width [C] for needles to cast-on. .
H Multiply the stitch gauge [A] times calf/thigh width [D] for needles to cast off. .
I Multiply ribbing length [F] times two (for both ends). Subtract the answer from the total length [E].

This is the patterning length.

.
J Subtract ankle width [C] from calf/thigh width [D] for number total increases. .
K Divide total increases [J] by 2, (we will increase at both sides at once), for the knitting increases. .
L Divide patterning length [I] by the knitting increases [K], for rows between increases. .
M Multiply ribbing length [F] times row gauge [B] for rows of ribbing. .
KNITTING THE LEGGINGS: .
Knit bottom ribbing rows, [put M here]: .
Set up for patterning.
(+2 stitches, every _________ [put L here] rows, __________ times [put K here] )
Work in pattern, making increases (above), you should end up with total stitches: [put H here.] .
Knit patterning length. [put I here], for the total amount of rows: .
Knit top ribbing rows. [put M here]: .
Loosely bind off stitches. .

Hobby Knitter 2 Carriage Technique

Cindy Polfer – [email protected]

TWO-CARRIAGE FAIR-ISLE

(copyright 1997 by Cindy Polfer)

Two-carriage fair-isle is really a neat way of knitting in your contrasting color by means of a carriage instead of hand manipulation. To work this method you need two carriages and an intarsia keyplate/carriage. The first carriage uses the regular keyplate and is threaded with the main color yarn. The second carriage has the intarsia keyplate inserted into it and is used to knit the contrasting color.

Here is the procedure:

Cast on the number of stitches needed for your project and knit the number of rows needed of the main color yarn until the two-colored patterning begins.

Step 1: Place the needles to be knit in the contrasting color into holding position (HP). Knit the main color stitches with the first carriage.

Step 2: Place the needles in HP into forward working position (FWP) [that is, the needles are in a position to knit with the stitches BEHIND the latches and the latches OPEN]. Now lay your contrasting color into the needles beginning with the needle farthest away from the first carriage. [It is actually the side from which you first starting knitting with the first carriage.] Place the second carriage, with the intarsia keyplate inserted, onto the bed at the side opposite the first carriage. [ It is the same side you started laying your contrasting yarn in the needles.] Push the second carriage across the needle bed, knitting in the FWP needles with the contrasting color. After you knit the row with the second carriage, all needles will be in FWP. REMOVE second carriage from the bed. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 to knit every row of pattern containing two colors.

Special Knitting Tips and Hints:

  1. While knitting, ALWAYS CHECK to see if the LATCH IS OPEN on any needle where the stitch is behind the latch.
  2. If you wish to knit in the yarn floats that occur between contrasting color sts or catch in the end of the contrasting yarn at the end of each row, work the following before knitting the main color of the next row as described in Step 1.

Floats: Before knitting the main color as described in Step 1 above, pick up the float (the best place is in the center) and place it on ONE of the needles directly above the float, placing the strand of yarn BEHIND THE LATCH with the stitch that is already there. It will knit into the back of the work as you pass the carriage to knit the main color. [My rule of thumb for knitting in floats is that I knit them in if they are carried more than 1″. Ex: If your stitch gauge is 5 sts = 1″ , I would always knit my float into the back of the work if the yarn is carried more than 5 stitches across the back. ] Also be careful of knitting in floats always in the same position (that is, on top of one another. Spread them out if possible. Also be careful of knitting in dark color floats on a light background. Sometimes they tend to show through. You may want to secure the floats by some other means after you have knitted your garment.

To catch in the contrasting color at end of row: Before knitting the main color as described in Step 1 above, take the end and lay the strand of yarn on the end needle or second to the end needle with the strand of yarn BEHIND THE LATCH. I then put a clothespin or clip on the end to insure there is some tension on the end and it will knit into the back of the work properly.

  1. Another tip is to adjust the intarsia keyplate tension to what works best with your main keyplate tension. You may want to have the intarsia keyplate tension slightly tighter to avoid droopy loops on the back of the fabric.

I hope this explains the procedure. I like knitting fair-isle this way because the contrasting color tension is much more even and it goes a little faster not having to hand manipulate all of those stitches.

If you don’t have a second carriage, they are available for purchase. You can do it without a second carriage, but you must always unthread and switch keyplates with every pass of the carriage. It becomes very tiresome – fast!!!!!

These instructions have also been written up in the BOND Stitch Encyclopedia Vol #1, and also in the Sept/Oct 1991 (Issue #44) of The Machine Knitters Source.

I gave you a few more hints and tips here than what you will find in those publications.

I am glad somebody asked about the technique and hope that you will show the technique to others.

I must ask though, that you respect copyright on this article written here and print it only for personal use. Thanks so very much!

Just a little background info from Cindy, “I never liked knitting the fair-isle stitches by hand, so I had been racking my brain as to a way in which they could be knitted with a carriage. It came to me one morning at 6AM while lying in bed!!! Needless to say, I had to get up and try my idea to see if it worked. I’m sure glad it did. You never know what you can come up with by doing a little thinking! Maybe you will discover a new technique.”

 

How to convert patterns to match your own gauge.

Converting Sweater Patterns . . to Fit Your Swatch Gauge

For any method, step one is always, MAKE A TENSION / GAUGE SWATCH.

You will need to know:

How many stitches are there in an inch of your swatch?

This is your STITCHES PER INCH: __________

How many rows are there in an inch of your swatch?

This is your ROWS PER INCH: __________

A pattern that has diagrams with exact measurements is the easiest to work with. You simply multiply the horizontal line measurements by your stitches per inch, and the vertical line measurements by your rows per inch.

(Stitches go left to right, and rows go up and down.)


If you are using a hand knitting pattern, you need a calculator to re-calculate the stitches and rows given. I find the easiest way is to photocopy the pattern, and write the new number in the line space above the old figures. If that seems confusing, white out the old numbers, use the original to fill in the new, as follows.

Divide your stitch gauge by the pattern stitch gauge to get the multiplier. (your gauge divided by pattern gauge = multiplier.)

Example: Your swatch is 9 stitches per inch, the pattern gauge is 8 stitches per inch. 9 divided by 8 = 1.125

Now everywhere the pattern gives stitches you multiply by the multiplier (Example = 1.125)

 

If the pattern says cast on 100 stitches, you would multiply 100 x 1.125 = 112.5 stitches. You decide whether to use 112 or 113. One stitch usually doesn’t matter much.

If the pattern says decrease 7 stitches for the underarm, the formula would be 7 x 1.125 =7.875, decrease 8 sts.

If the pattern says the shoulder is 24 stitches, use 24 x 1.125 = 27 stitches.

Now we do the same thing with the row gauge.

Divide your row gauge by the pattern row gauge to get the multiplier. (your gauge divided by pattern gauge = multiplier.)

Example: Your gauge is 12 rows per inch the pattern gauge is 15 rows per inch. 12 divided by15 = 0.8

Everywhere the pattern tells you to knit rows, you multiply by the multiplier. (Example=0.8)

If the pattern says to knit 10 rows, use 10 x 0.8 = 8 rows.

 

If the pattern says to knit 33 rows, use 33 x 0.8 = 26.4, decide whether to knit 26 or 27 rows to fit the pattern.

The only time this is tricky, is when there are complicated sleeve increases and decreases. Try to make them match the rows to be knit. Often you may have to double up on the decreases in order to have all the decreases finished by the last row.

 

I used to use only Windows programs, but there are so many Phone apps, look at them and decide which ones you like.